Author: Bill Boyd

Editor’s note: This is another column in Bill Boyd’s new series, “The Way It Was,” about growing up in Marysville. Bill continues to work with the Union County Historical Society to obtain information for his stories. ––– It was sometime in the late 1930s, when I was five or six years old, that we visited my Uncle Jake for a Sunday afternoon picnic. He was actually my great uncle, the brother of my grandmother, Hettie Tracy. It was always fun to be there when Jake and Hettie got together. There was so much joking and laughing. Everyone could see how…

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Editor’s note: This is another column in Bill Boyd’s new series, “The Way It Was,” about growing up in Marysville. Bill continues to work with the Union County Historical Society to obtain information for his stories. ––– A couple years ago, I wrote about the World War I cannon that stood in the lawn between the courthouse and West 5th Street. Like many other kids in town, I enjoyed that cannon, and I spent hours climbing all over it. I also fought a lot of pretend battles with it. Only recently, however, did I find that some of my assumptions…

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Editor’s note: This is another column in Bill Boyd’s new series, “The Way It Was,” about growing up in Marysville. Bill continues to work with the Union County Historical Society to obtain information for his stories. ––– When I was a kid, most of my dad’s fishing was done right here in central Ohio. Every now and then, however, he and some of his fishing buddies would go on an out-of-state fishing trip, usually somewhere in Michigan. Then in 1946, he and two of his fishing friends, Bob Henderson and “Hap” Coleman, went on one of his most successful…

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Editor’s note: This is another column in Bill Boyd’s new series, “The Way It Was,” about growing up in Marysville. Bill continues to work with the Union County Historical Society to obtain information for his stories. ––– Several years ago when I first started writing a column in the Journal-Tribune, I sometimes took a morning walk in our neighborhood. That’s when I often got ideas of things to write about. Occasionally, as I thought about some of my boyhood memories, I laughed out loud. There were probably a number of people along my walking route who asked themselves, “Who is…

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Editor’s note: This is another column in Bill Boyd’s new series, “The Way It Was,” about growing up in Marysville. Bill continues to work with the Union County Historical Society to obtain information for his stories. ––– During the summers when I was growing up in Marysville, it was easy to pick the six-year-olds out of a crowd. All you had to do was look at their left arm. All six-year-olds, boys and girls alike, had a scab about the size of a dime a few inches below their shoulder. It was where they had received their vaccination for smallpox.…

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Editor’s note: This is another column in Bill Boyd’s new series, “The Way It Was,” about growing up in Marysville. Bill continues to work with the Union County Historical Society to obtain information for his stories. ––– When I was about 10 or 11-years-old, I started to get interested in college football. I listened to Ohio State games on Saturdays. Those radio announcers were great, and they sometimes got me pretty worked up. When the game was over, I would grab my football and go across the street to Mrs. Cagy’s front lawn, at the corner of Fifth and Maple…

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Editor’s note: This is another column in Bill Boyd’s new series, “The Way It Was,” about growing up in Marysville. Bill continues to work with the Union County Historical Society to obtain information for his stories. ––– I don’t think I have had a hole in the heel of a sock in years. But when I was a kid, it seemed like I had one hole after another. When I played basketball on Elwood Sawyer’s tennis court on West Fourth Street, my heels slid in and out of my leather school shoes, and I think that’s what made the holes.…

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Editor’s note: This is another column in Bill Boyd’s new series, “The Way It Was,” about growing up in Marysville. Bill continues to work with the Union County Historical Society to obtain information for his stories. ––– I think there are people who collect almost everything, from postage stamps to autographs or from coins to antique cars. Sometimes the collecting can get out of hand. For example, I once read about a lady collector who died, and you wouldn’t believe what they found in her house – hundreds of salt and pepper shakers, doll clothes and miniature porcelain dogs. I…

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Editor’s note: This is another column in Bill Boyd’s new series, “The Way It Was,” about growing up in Marysville. Bill continues to work with the Union County Historical Society to obtain information for his stories. ––– Some time ago, I wrote something about a pet peeve of mine, the overuse of the word “awesome.” Today, two or three years later, I’d like to say a few more words about it, because it is still one of my pet peeves. Fifty years ago, “awesome” was one of my favorite words. It wasn’t used often, but it was perfect to describe…

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Editor’s note: This is another column in Bill Boyd’s new series, “The Way It Was,” about growing up in Marysville. Bill continues to work with the Union County Historical Society to obtain information for his stories. ––– During the late 1930s, my dad almost always bought his gasoline for our car at the Sohio station on East 5th Street. I once asked him if they had better gas then the other stations in town. He told me that gasoline is gasoline and there is no real difference between gas at one station or another. Nevertheless, at that time, a person…

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Editor’s note: This is another column in Bill Boyd’s new series, “The Way It Was,” about growing up in Marysville. Bill continues to work with the Union County Historical Society to obtain information for his stories. ––– Some time ago, I wrote about my dad’s love of fly fishing and how he tied his own flies. In winter he tied more flies than he could use the following summer, so he sometimes sold the flies to bait and tackle stores. They often wanted to buy more, but he wasn’t interested in going into the fly-making business. It was just a…

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Editor’s note: This is another column in Bill Boyd’s new series, “The Way It Was,” about growing up in Marysville. Bill continues to work with the Union County Historical Society to obtain information for his stories. ––– Some time ago, I wrote about Earl Chiesa’s soda fountain and confectionery downtown on West Fifth Street. He and his brother made wonderful candies: chocolate creams and nut clusters, plus the best taffy I ever tasted. Earl also sold cigars. In fact, I think he may have had the best cigar selection in town. There was, however, something I always found a bit…

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Editor’s note: This is another column in Bill Boyd’s new series, “The Way It Was,” about growing up in Marysville. Bill continues to work with the Union County Historical Society to obtain information for his stories. ––– It was sometime in early November of 2020, when I realized that I had neglected to get my annual flu shot. I usually got it in September, so a few days later, a friend took me to one of those “drive-thru” clinics that were set up to give flu shots during the Covid thing. I figured they would be mobbed with people, and…

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Editor’s note: This is another column in Bill Boyd’s new series, “The Way It Was,” about growing up in Marysville. Bill continues to work with the Union County Historical Society to obtain information for his stories. ––– In 1938, my mother saw an announcement in the Marysville Tribune that a cooking school was coming to town. It would be held in the high school auditorium on West 6th Street. I think it was sponsored by the gas company. My mother was excited about the whole thing. She liked to cook and could learn to make some new dishes. A special…

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Editor’s note: This is another column in Bill Boyd’s new series, “The Way It Was,” about growing up in Marysville. Bill continues to work with the Union County Historical Society to obtain information for his stories. ––– When I was in high school during the late 1940s, I saw a lot of fads in mens and boys clothing. Take shoes, for example. At one time or another, there were penny loafers, saddle shoes and white bucks. I think all three of those reached “fad status” at one time or another. Pants were another story. The legs of most men’s and…

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